Category Archives: Reading

Reading Update!

This past week in reading, we revisited paying close attention to how our characters were feeling in the beginning, middle, and end of a book. Each day we read a story and stopped three different times to discuss the characters’ feelings.  We noticed that almost always our characters’ feelings do change!  Often the main character started off happy, in the middle something happened to make them feel scared, sad, or mad, but by the end the problem was resolved.  We compared the characters feelings in our books to a rollercoaster with lots of ups and downs.  We also noticed that when our characters’ feeling change they are learning an important lesson.

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Reading Update!

In Reader’s Workshop this past week we focused on characters in the books we are reading. We focused on how our characters were acting and tried to find descriptive words for these character traits (bossy, confident, brave, anxious, selfish, demanding, mean, shy, sneaky, etc.).

We practiced with some of our favorite Kevin Henkes books. We will continue working on characters next week!

Reading Update!

This past week in reader’s workshop, we looked at words that were important to our topic. We practiced with a non-fiction book about the Sun & Plants. We found the words solar panelschlorophyll, and photosynthesis to be important words. These words helped us learn and teach others about what we read about. We shared our topic’s important words with the class too!

We remembered how important it is to understand what we are reading and with some of these new topics and tricky vocabulary words, we needed to use some of the tools that nonfiction books provide for us to figure out what the new words mean.  We checked out the glossary for definitions, but also looked at the pictures, checked to see if there were any captions on the page, and reread the words in that section to look for clues.

Reading Update!

We jumped back into reading workshop this week by helping ourselves get ready to read new books by first asking what we already knew about our topic before reading. When we pulled out a new book, we asked ourselves, “What do I already know?” This helps get our mind ready to make connections to new ideas.  We spent time comparing the books in our ‘topic bags’ and really thinking about the facts we were learning.  They were able to find examples in multiple books that taught the same information, so they knew that fact must be true.  We were able to share with our partners about things we had learned.

Reading Update!

In Reader’s Workshop, we started a new unit focused on learning from all types of texts. We filled bags with different topics (dogs, dinosaurs, weather, plants, presidents, etc.)! The students are working with a bag of books that focus on one big idea for a few days.  Some of the books from their topic are nonfiction and some are fiction.  The first graders spend time each day reading through the books on their topic to see what they can learn and teach others about their topic.

Reading Update!

We’ve already learned so much about being a great decoder and how important it is to use strategies to figure out tricky words.  This week, we tried to push ourselves even more as readers, by learning a new strategy that taught us how to break apart words into syllables, so we could decode multi-syllable words.  This new strategy had a special name: SPOT & DOT!!!

Before we could try SPOT & DOT we had to develop our understanding of a syllable.  We learned that words can be split apart into syllables and every syllable has its own vowel sound.  (This vowel sound is sometimes made up of a vowel all by itself.  Other times it’s made up of a team of vowels working together.)   Since our SPOT & DOT strategy works with words that contain two or more syllables, we studied several words and tried to predict if they had only one syllable or many syllables.

Next, we were ready to SPOT & DOT.  We followed the steps below:

After Step 3, we swooped our fingers under each syllable to read the word.

We tried reading many 2-syllable and 3-syllable words as a class before the kids tried some on their own.  We will continue practicing this strategy next week as we tackle some of the tricky multi-syllable words the kids find in their own books.

Some more fun books!

We had so much fun practicing with some of our higher level comprehension books that force the kids to figure out tricky vocabulary words and really infer beyond the text to understand the story.

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We first read the book The Stranger (Chris Van Allsburg).  This story really puts the kids to the test to see if they can be careful to pay attention to all the small details that are on each page and put them all together to figure out who the stranger is.  We stopped on each page to check for understanding  about the WHO? and WHAT? and by the end, the kids were so proud of all the thinking they were doing to figure out who this stranger really was.

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Then, we spent time reading the book The Sweetest Fig, by Chris VanAllsburg.  The kids shared so many questions and connections, it was easy to see the thinking they were doing in order to figure out what was happening in this story.  We had lots of vocabulary questions to figure out in this book.  One of the questions was, ‘What is a fig?‘  I made a stop by the grocery store and found some in the dried fruit section.  I brought in some dried figs and the kids were enthralled with them.  We had many adventurous first graders who were willing to try one and most of the kids loved them.  I am pretty sure they taste like raisins, that’s what they looked like at least.  I didn’t try one (not quite as adventurous as they are).  In the story, when the characters ate the sweet figs, their dreams came true. So, if your child was adventurous and tried a fig today, don’t forget to…

Ask your first grader if their dreams came true!!!

 The kids had such a blast with these books.  You should check some out at home!!

Good Readers are Thinkers!

We have been talking about how good readers are thinking while they read.  One of the ways that we think is by making connections or by visualizing.  Another way readers think while they read is by asking questions.  This week we began our focus on questioning by revisiting one of our favorite stories, Tuesday, by David Weisner.  We talked about how readers can have questions about a book before they read it, while they read it, and after they read it. The kids had a blast walking their way through the pictures and asking questions about what was happening in the story.  We later went back and tried to find answers to some of our questions.

The kids were so excited to read another book written by David Wiesner.  We read the book  Sector 7.  Just like his other books, the pictures leave a lot of room for questions and discussion.  We know that good readers ask questions and as we asked questions about what was going on in the book, we were able to share our ideas and work together to infer what was really happening.

We spent the rest of the week on another classic David Weisner book, FLOTSAM.  The kids couldn’t take their eyes off this book and were begging to share their thinking.  It was so much fun!  It was fun to see their understanding of the book develop as they shared their thinking with the class.

Reading Update!

This week, we reviewed the long vowel combinations that we’ve introduced:

ee, ea, ai, oa & oy, ay, ey, y & ow, ou.

And then we introduced a new set of vowel teams. We discussed vowel teams:

aw, au, ue, oo, ew.

The first graders are building a collection of vowel teams to help them decode tricky words. This week, we will dig into multisyllabic words with a new decoding strategy called Spot & Dot.