Category Archives: Math

Math Update!

During our math time this week, we spent time studying our 120 number grid.  We noticed patterns in the ones place and tens place going across the grid and down the grid.  We also used our number grid to find 10 more and 10 less than a number.

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While our number grid can be very helpful, it’s not our only tool for adding ten more and ten less.  We can also use our ten sticks find the answer when adding and subtracting tens or adding and subtracting just the tens place or ones place.

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We will continue using our strategies next week to add and subtract two digit numbers!

We learned how to use the partners of 100 to solve equations that totaled 100. The partners of 100 are very similar to the partners of 10; however, we are working with tens instead of ones. This strategy came in handy for solving some of our two-digit equations as well.

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We also used our understanding of the relationship between addition and subtraction to solve equations. This strategy helped us to quickly find the missing partner in an addition equation once we solved the subtraction equation.

Math Update!

During our math time this week, we continued to solve missing partner and missing total stories. We also stretched our thinking by using the Make a Ten strategy to solve equations and math stories with three addends or partners. After we looked for two partners that could make a ten, we found that adding the third partner to ten was a snap!

We are starting to work on counting and writing numbers up to 120. To help your first grader practice this skill, have him/her start at any 2 digit number and then count out loud to 120. This could be a great activity to do together in the car. As an extra challenge, you can even have your child write the numerals up to 120!

Math Update!

This week our math switch groups reviewed how solve missing partner addition and subtraction equations.  To support our math learning we added new purple and blue quilt cards to our math toolkits.  Our purple and blue cards are very similar to our previous yellow and orange cards, except this time we are encouraging our mathematicians to count-on or “make a ten” as they solve equations with teen totals.
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We also began solving mixed stories again.The first graders performed very successfully when they complete the appropriate steps in order.

Math Update!

This week, we reviewed everything we have learned about tens and ones, comparing numbers (<, >, =), counting on, making a 10, and using our doubles facts.
We took our Unit 4 assessment later in the week.  The kids worked very hard to double check their work and be careful counters.  Your child’s test went home on Friday.  If a section of the test is still a little fragile for your child, we will continue working on those skills here at school.
We are looking forward to solving more stories and working with teen totals during our Unit 5 that will begin on Monday.

Math Update!

This week, we began adding a two-digit number (containing a tens number and a ones number) together with some additional ones. To complete this task, we utilized two strategies. First, our handy-dandy method of counting on:

We had to be extra careful that we counted on accurately.  We made sure that we did this by always going back to double check our work and using our number grids to help us count through the decade numbers. Our second strategy helped us visualize how ones can be grouped together to “make a new ten” – even when we’re working with larger numbers. This method is an introduction to the regrouping strategies that your child will use in second grade and beyond.

Math Update!

In math, we continued to study LARGE, TWO-DIGIT numbers.  In particular, we used the greater than, less than, and equal to symbols ( >, <, = ) to compare these numbers.  When we compare numbers, we stressed the importance of building each number with ten sticks and ones to easily identify which number has more tens.  If both numbers have the same amount of tens, then we can compare the ones to find the greater number.  Our first graders quickly noticed that the greater than and less than signs look like a “hungry mouth” ready to gobble up which ever number is greatest.

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Just be careful… don’t let number like: 29 & 92 or 45 & 54 or 78 & 87 – trick you!!!  Build those numbers and pay attention to the tens!!!  Please review this concept with your first grader, if you notice him or her getting a little confused on the homework.

This week we also practiced adding ones numbers (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9) together, and tens numbers (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90) together.  Our first graders worked hard to notice which numbers they were working with so they could accurately represent each equation.  In order to prove our work, we used ten sticks and circles to help us find the missing total.

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Math Update!

After reviewing the MAKE A TEN STRATEGY, we took a math quiz, which the students all did very well on. Then, we moved on to studying our doubles facts. Many of our first graders know the first 5 doubles in a snap. The final 5 doubles were a little tougher.

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We talked about how we can use what we know about doubles to help us solve other equations. We noticed that there is often a set of doubles that can be found hiding inside an equation. If we can find the hidden double, all we need to do is add one or subtract one to solve the equation.  For example:
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We will continue to work on our doubles facts, so our first graders can more easily use the Doubles +1 and Doubles -1 strategy. It would be wonderful if your child could practice their doubles facts at home too!! Practice makes permanent!!

We also studied some LARGE, TWO-DIGIT numbers this week — some of the biggest numbers that we’ve worked with so far this year!  We noticed that every 2-digit number has a place to show the tens hiding inside along with a place to show the extra ones.  We also represented these numbers using ten sticks and circles, and wrote an equation to match our work.

Since we were working with two digit numbers, we spent a lot of time counting tens and ones this week too.  Our first graders learned to count the tens first and then “freeze” before counting up the extra ones.  Taking the time to “freeze” is an important strategy that helps our students recognize when it’s time to switch from counting by 10s to 1s.

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We can tell that our first graders are really beginning to understand the place value of these larger numbers!!!

Math Update!

This week, we introduced our first graders to a new addition strategy called “Make a 10″.  For the equation, 9 + 4 = ___, we can “count on” to find the total of 13.  Since the total, 13, is a teen number (which has a 10 hiding inside) we helped our students notice that 9 + 4 = 10 + 3.  Both of these equations produce the total 13, but solving 10 + 3 is quicker and more accurate.

We will spend much of our math time next week working with this new strategy, as it is still very new and fragile.

Math Update!

As a first grade staff, we are always striving to meet the needs of each and every student.  In order to do this, we studied the data from our students’ math performance so far this year, and used this information to group together students with similar areas of expertise and areas of need. For this unit, many of our students will be taking part in a “math switch” in which they may be traveling to a different classroom, so that they are able to work in the group and with the teacher that will help them reach their full potential as a math learner.  Each group of math learners will be working on the same math concepts each day, but the pace and practice may look a little different.

We began new math learning this past week!!  Our Unit 4 in math will focus on tens and teen numbers, place value to 100, and strategies for adding larger numbers.  So far, we’ve practiced counting groups of tens.

We studied the teen numbers (11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19) and noticed that every teen number has a 10 hiding inside along with some extra ones.  We also represented teen numbers using a ten stick and circles, and wrote an equation to match our work.